ads

Free Delivery on all Books at the Book Depository

Slider[Style1]

Style2

Style3[OneLeft]

Style3[OneRight]

Style4

Style5

Style6[OneLeft]

Style6[OneRight]

Have you heard? Texas author J.T. Bishop has a new book out! HIGH CHILD is the fifth book in J. T. Bishop’s award winning Red-Line saga. Enjoy this guest post from the author!

Creating Your Characters

What makes reading fun? Is it getting caught up in a gripping story? Escaping into a different world? These things are key. But what drives the energy and keeps you enthralled? It’s the characters. Good ones, bad ones, funny ones, sad ones, jealous, angry, compassionate and vulnerable ones. You get a good mix, get them all together, and you’re likely to have a good read on your hands.
Creating my characters when I write is one of the most enjoyable aspects of the craft. I love the challenge of throwing people together, adding in some conflict, and seeing what happens. Many times, I don’t know where it will lead. I want the characters to direct the scene and guide me to whatever conclusion they choose. And they’ve never disappointed. I’ve laughed, cried and gasped at some of the things they’ve done. But I trust them to take the story where it needs to go.
When it comes to the initial writing of a book, I have the main characters in mind when I start. I know their personality, humor and overall disposition. But as I write, the supporting characters begin to reveal themselves and I believe they are fundamental to the main character’s development. They can often shape and reveal the protagonist in a way I would find hard to do otherwise. Having a main character riddled with angst and doubt and on the verge of suicide is great drama, but add in a supporting best friend who is there to help them through it adds an emotional element that builds on the tension and tugs the heart strings. I like the interplay between two people, especially if they care for one another. It allows me to show vulnerability and love, even if they’re in an argument and end up screaming at each other. But if you can convey the common thread between them, then you will pull your reader in because they’ll want to know what happens next. How will the problem be resolved? They want to see the scene where the differences are dealt with and friendship and romance resumes. Everybody likes a happy ending.
For me, some of my favorite stories involve core characters with layers of depth who all come together to survive difficult, sometimes life-threatening circumstances. I get to pit them against each other and see what emerges. And they don’t have to be arch enemies. Frequently, they’re lovers, best friends, or siblings. Maybe they drive each other nuts, but in the end, when the dirty stuff hits the fan, their true colors emerge and they’re there for each other.
Even when there’s a bad guy who you know will get his comeuppance in the end, there’s still a need to make them vulnerable and needy as well. I mean how did they become sick and twisted anyway? Add a little back story and you’ve got an interesting antagonist. There are so many ways to play with this, and I love allowing it to play out, especially when the protagonist gets involved. The more you can get your characters to relate to one another, show emotion, and reveal their darker or lighter side, the faster you will draw your reader in. And once they’re invested in your people, they’ll want to see what’s going to happen, and they’re going to keep reading until they find out.
Do you find this to be true? What’s your favorite aspect of a book? Is it the characters? If so, what are some of the more memorable characters that have stayed with you? What was it about them that kept you reading? Comment below and let me know. I’d like to know what kept you coming back for more. 
High Child
by J.T.Bishop


 

ISBN-13: 978-0692916193
Publisher: J. T. Bishop; 1 edition
Series: Red-Line, Book 5
Paperback: 383 pages
September 21, 2017, $14.95
Genre: Paranormal Suspense
  
Also available in ebook format

Purchase Link: Amazon


Gifted with unique abilities, Royce Fletcher struggled to find his place in the world. Living a solitary life in the woods, he finds his quiet existence disrupted by unexpected visitors. Visitors he would prefer to avoid.

Despite his attempts to protect himself, Royce finds himself caught up in an unexpected romance, a local murder investigation, and a destiny he has little interest in pursuing.
The more he tries to pull away, the more drawn in he becomes until he must face the demons that refuse to go away. Demons that risk more than just his life, but all that he holds dear.



If you haven’t read any J.T. Bishop books yet, you must. She’s a brilliant up-and-coming author. Her writing is vivid and captivating, her immersive story well-plotted, and her characters relatable and unique. 

– NY Literary Magazine review of Curse Breaker




ABOUT THE AUTHOR



Born and raised in Dallas, TX, J. T. Bishop began writing in 2012. Inspired by a video that theorized the meaning of the end of the Mayan calendar, J. T. began the Red-Line trilogy. The video surmised that the earth was the central hub of activity for extraterrestrials thousands of years ago. J.T. didn’t know whether that was true or not, but it did spawn an idea. What if those extraterrestrials were still here? Two years and a lot of work later, the first three Red-Line books were complete, but she’s not done. The Red-Line saga develops as she continues to write new books.









BreakThrough Promotions


About Mayor Sonni

Reader extraordinaire. Mayor of Readeropolis. Lover of books, lists, sweet tea, and vacations. Well, not necessarily in that order.
«
Next
Newer Post
»
Previous
Older Post

No comments:

Post a Comment


Top