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Where were you born/grew up at?

I was born in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (off Canada's east coast). The population then was fewer than twenty thousand. My parents moved me, my two brothers and two sisters around. My father pursued degrees at both Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) and Penn State University (Pennsylvania, U.S.A.). Eventually, my parents returned us to Charlottetown. I finished high school and college there. Those were my most memorable and formative years growing up.


Although I still consider Prince Edward Island my home, I had to leave. The small island is made of sandstone and ocean waves constantly eat away. Soon—maybe thousands of years from now—but soon, it may melt into the Atlantic.

Truth is, I had to move for work.

What is something unique/quirky about you?

I can eat ANYTHING you put in front of me. . .except for maybe Brussel sprouts, and probably mashed sweet potatoes. I definitely don’t like mincemeat pie.
I do love bacon though, and some other things.

If you knew you'd die tomorrow, how would you spend your last day?

I would take my wife and daughters out for a nice breakfast, talk and laugh. Then, I would hug my girls, tell them how much they mean to me, how proud I am. My wife and I would fly to a Caribbean beach where we would swim, snorkel, and soak in the sun for the day. We would enjoy each other’s company over dinner and through the evening. If I could spend a full day with those three amazing girls before I went, I would be a lucky and happy man.

Who is your hero and why?

Bobby Orr! As a Canadian, I am a hockey fan to the core. When I was young, Bobby’s injury shortened career was winding down. He called it quits when I turned twelve. But seeing him play for the Boston Bruins and then Team Canada in 1976 will stick with me forever. The many highlight reels I’ve watched certainly helped etch his heroic feats in my memory.
I was lucky enough to meet Bobby a few years ago and he was every bit the humble gentleman I had heard. That was a surreal experience.

What do you do to unwind and relax?

I like to unwind by picking away on my guitar. Picking and strumming occupies my mind and the melody sooths. Often, I will hear a song on the radio during my drive home and then I’m anxious to get back and try to pick it up.

Describe yourself in 5 words or less!

Loving, hateful, energetic, lethargic, and confused.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I finished my first novel, my family told me they were proud. They asked me how it felt to be a writer. I said I felt great, but that one book did not make me a writer. The feeling of accomplishment was significant for sure. Though, there was still so much of that story to tell—there is still. I have outlined a follow-up to that novel and plan to start it soon.

To be a writer, you must give yourself fully. Write every day. Read every day. There are some days that I have not been able to steal the time. I kick myself for it, but it still happens. I tell myself I will be a writer when I retire from my day job.

I wrote many short stories before I completed my second novel, What Lies Within. Which, by the way, is not a follow-up to the first novel, Society for Supper. Shortly after finishing What Lies Within, I began its follow-up in a planned series.

That story too, still has so much to say.

Until I complete one of the stories, and commit time more regularly, I will not feel like I have earned that title. If ever.

Besides—those who have the voices in their heads, have to scribble and type to get them out. They must scribe, fret, toil, and bleed. They must self-loath and self-chastise, but never entitle themselves with garish designations such as ‘writer’.



What Lies Within
by Robert Smith
Genre: Crime Thriller

There are four kinds of Homicide:
felonious, excusable, justifiable, and praiseworthy.”
Ambrose Bierce



This is a story about duty, revenge, murder, and horror.
The system failed Tyler McDermitt. He and his brother have vowed to protect unfortunate youth from a similar fate - or at least make those responsible, pay. The McDermitt brothers, victims of child abuse and molestation, escaped their hell and have decided to clean up after the failings of a flawed justice system.
The rough streets of Dorchester, south Boston, have hardened two aspiring vigilantes and prepared them for a mission. One brother has a good heart, a conscience, and a burning

compassion. His twisted sense of morality has burdened him with a deep sense of responsibility. The other brother is as hard as nails and as cold as ice. He is hell-bent on revenge and aims to ensure the other stays the course.
A motivated young detective is on their scent; she and her veteran partner look to foil McDermitt brothers' plan.
Something from the boys' past - something dark - is also closing in.





Robert Smith (A.K.A. TyCobbsTeeth) hails from Prince Edward Island (off Canada's east coast).


On this small island, ocean waves drive hard against red cliffs. So, with fears that the sandstone island might soon melt into the Atlantic, Robert finished his studies in Information Technology and moved to Canada's capital.

Robert has worked in network design, administration and security. He recently transitioned from a job managing a digital forensics team (supporting investigations) to Enterprise Architecture. That's his day job. At night, he writes.

This author writes thrillers (psychological, suspense, crime and horror). Pick one up if you like that sort of thing.




Follow the tour HERE for exclusive excerpts, guest posts and a giveaway!





Prologue

Boston, Massachusetts
His name was Devil... Devil McDermitt, and it suited him. Mine? Mine’s Tyler. Together we lurked in the shadows, scrutinized targets, and carried out our plans. Looking back, I see how much he influenced... maybe even manipulated me.
It was 2014, and we lived in Boston, South Dorchester, or Dawchestah to be more precise. We were there as far back as my memory does justice, and it was always considered a tough area. Really, everything south of South Boston from Cottage Street down to Gallivan Boulevard and everything east of Blue Hill Avenue was considered rough. Rough, that is, if you weren’t from there.
If you were… then you were used to it, and it was all you knew. It wasn’t rough, it was just the way it was—that was life.
If you weren’t from Boston and you were looking to visit, some people may tell you to stick to Boston main—visit Beacon Hill, check out Boston Common and the Freedom Trail, walk the waterfront, and maybe even head over the bridge to Charlestown—there’s some cool stuff there. You may not be pointed toward the Bay State Model Railway Museum in Roslindale, but it’s wicked balls, and that area is pretty safe too.
What they won’t point you toward is Dorchester. Area newspapers have run stories of late that would lead you to believe that East Roxbury and Mattapan are more threatening than Dorchester, and don’t get me wrong, you don’t want to wander there at night, but we still have our crap in Dorchester
too.
It was fall, or as the Redcoats called it, autumn, and fall was my favorite time of year.


About Mayor Sonni

Reader extraordinaire. Mayor of Readeropolis. Lover of books, lists, sweet tea, and vacations. Well, not necessarily in that order.
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3 comments:

  1. Best of luck with the book and book tour! I included the tour in the Monday, Jul. 09, 2018 edition of The BookTube Your Shelf Daily Reader: https://paper.li/Readeropolis/1517059010#/

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love this genre and this one sounds thrilling. Killer cover too!

    ReplyDelete


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