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Three Questions with Karen Perkins | Ghosts of Thores-Cross by Karen Perkins | Book Tour | Paranormal Suspense

Ghosts of Thores-Cross by Karen Perkins is on virtual book tour.  The paranormal suspense series stops at Readeropolis with an...



Ghosts of Thores-Cross by Karen Perkins is on virtual book tour. 

The paranormal suspense series stops at Readeropolis with an author interview and an excerpt from The Haunting of Thores-Cross

Be sure to enter for a chance to win the giveaway and follow the Silver Dagger book tour (for other dates see the link at the bottom of the post).



What is something unique/quirky about you?

I grew up a very keen sailor, and would be at the sailing club almost every weekend – including winter! As I grew older, I started sailing contenders – a single-handed trapeze dinghy – and at one time was the only female in the country to sail one.

In 1995, I took it to the European Championships in Germany, winning the ladies title (no, I wasn’t the only woman in Europe!). Unfortunately, I injured my back during the competition; an injury that would change my life. It triggered the chronic pain and fatigue condition fibromyalgia, which I’ve been battling ever since.

This indirectly led me to writing – I had been leading such a busy life, I never sat down long enough to write a short story never mind a novel! But now I had time. I picked up a pen and I just wrote, and wrote, and wrote. I cannot now imagine doing anything else, and although I still have to manage the fibromyalgia, books and writing have given me a future again, and a fulfilling life.

I’ve now published eight fiction titles, with more to come, plus I edit and format books for other authors, and have helped over 200 books be published so far. It’s wonderful to have purpose again!


Which of your novels can you imagine being made into a movie?


I’m often told that The Haunting of Thores-Cross would make a great movie or TV series. Not only the character of Jennet, but the setting of the moors plays a major part of the story, and is very atmospheric. I’m a visual writer – I see the scenes unfolding as I write, and do my best to bring that to the page so that people can picture the characters and the story unfolding as they read.

What literary pilgrimages have you gone on?

I love to go to Haworth, West Yorkshire, the home of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë, as often as possible. On my first visit there I was inspired to write Parliament of Rooks, and there are many more Haworth-inspired books swirling around my mind.

The village itself is very atmospheric – it really does feel like going back into time – but the Parsonage (the Brontë home) is even more so. Surrounded by the churchyard, it brings home just how close to death the Brontës lived, and new insight into their fabulous books. The inside of their home has been restored extremely well – you can almost see the sisters walking around the dining table, reading aloud to each other. Well worth a visit, and I cannot wait to get back there myself.




The Haunting of Thores-Cross
Ghosts of Thores-Cross Book 1
by Karen Perkins
Genre: Paranormal Suspense


"The ghost of a wronged young woman in the village of Thores-Cross waits 230 years to have her story told in Perkins's suspenseful and atmospheric first Yorkshire Ghost novel" - BookLife by Publishers Weekly


*Silver Medal Winner, European fiction - 2015 IPPY Book Awards
*#1 Bestseller in 6 Amazon Categories, including Ghost Suspense, British Horror and Gothic Romance

*Top 10 Bestseller in 8 more, including Historical Thrillers and Occult Horror
*Over 100 5-STAR reviews on Amazon.com

Likened by independent reviewers on Amazon to the Brontë sisters, Edgar Allen Poe, Barbara Erskine and Nathaniel Hawthorne, Karen Perkins' novels are filled with unflinching honesty and an acute understanding of human nature. She explores not only the depths of humanity, but the depths of human motivation behind the actions and pain people inflict upon each other, as well as the repercussions of these actions not only in the short term, but also the later generations who live with the implications of the past.

Emma Moorcroft is still grieving after a late miscarriage and moves to her dream house at Thruscross Reservoir with her husband, Dave. Both Emma and Dave hope that moving into their new home signifies a fresh start, but life is not that simple. Emma has nightmares about the reservoir and the drowned village that lies beneath the water, and is further disturbed by the sound of church bells - from a church that no longer exists.

Jennet is fifteen and lives in the isolated community of Thores-Cross, where life revolves about the sheep on which they depend. Following the sudden loss of both her parents, she is seduced by the local wool merchant, Richard Ramsgill. She becomes pregnant and is shunned not only by Ramsgill, but by the entire village. Lonely and embittered, Jennet's problems escalate, leading to tragic consequences which continue to have an effect through the centuries.

Emma becomes fixated on Jennet, neglecting herself, her beloved dogs and her husband to the point where her marriage may not survive. As Jennet and Emma's lives become further entwined, Emma's obsession deepens and she realises that the curse Jennet inflicted on the Ramsgill family over two hundred years ago is still claiming lives.

Emma is the only one who can stop Jennet killing again, but will her efforts be enough?













Cursed
Ghosts of Thores-Cross Book 2


Jennet's here. No one is safe.


A skeleton is dug up at the crossing of the ways on Hanging Moor, striking dread into the heart of Old Ma Ramsgill - the elderly matriarch of the village of Thruscross. And with good reason. The eighteenth-century witch, Jennet, has been woken.

A spate of killings by a vicious black dog gives credence to her warnings and the community - in particular her family - realise they are in terrible danger.

Drastic measures are needed to contain her, but with the imminent flooding of the valley to create a new reservoir, do they have the ability to stop her and break her curse?









Jennet
Ghosts of Thores-Cross Book 3


Jennet will have your heart and your fear in equal measure’
Through Jennet we see how cruelty can drive even the most ordinary people to hatred and, in Jennet's case, evil
Yorkshire is in the grip of a heatwave, and Thruscross Reservoir has dried up to reveal the remains of the drowned village of Thores-Cross beneath.
Playing in the mud which coats the valley floor, four-year-old Clare Wainwright finds an old inkpot, and can’t wait to show it to her best friend, Louise. But when Louise’s mother, Emma, sees it, her reaction is shocking, and both families are plunged into their worst nightmares.
Emma knows what the inkpot portends:
Jennet has woken.
Now she wants the children.
This is not a gore-ridden, jump-scare horror story. This is more real than that. Jennet is a story about the horrific things that people do to each other, and the way we react to that maltreatment – which does not always end with death.
Jennet’s story is a horror story because it’s not necessarily fiction. It reflects the way women were treated in the time that Jennet lived. It reflects the psychology of the abuse cycle. And it reflects real life. All of it.
If, as I believe, the spirit does not die when the physical body dies, then how many spirits are looking for vengeance today?
What wrongs will you want to right when you pass through that veil? What will I?
This is the conclusion of Jennet’s story, which began in The Haunting of Thores-Cross. I hope she finds peace. I really do.






Karen Perkins is the author of eight fiction titles: the Yorkshire Ghost Stories and the Valkyrie Series of historical nautical fiction. All of her fiction has appeared at the top of bestseller lists on both sides of the Atlantic, including the top 21 in the UK Kindle Store in 2018.

Her first Yorkshire Ghost Story - THE HAUNTING OF THORES-CROSS - won the Silver Medal for European Fiction in the prestigious 2015 Independent Publisher Book Awards in New York, whilst her Valkyrie novel, DEAD RECKONING, was long-listed in the 2011 MSLEXIA novel competition.


Originally a financial advisor, a sailing injury left Karen with a chronic pain condition which she has been battling for over twenty five years (although she did take the European ladies title despite the injury!). Writing has given her a new lease of - and purpose to - life, and she is currently working on a sequel to Parliament of Rooks: Haunting Brontë Country.

When not writing, she helps other authors prepare their books for publishing and has edited over 150 titles, including the 2017 Kindle UK Storyteller Award winner, The Relic Hunters by David Leadbeater, and has also published a series of publishing guides to help aspiring authors realise their dreams.

Karen Perkins is a member of the Society of Authors and the Horror Writers Association.






Follow the tour HERE for exclusive excerpts, guest posts and a giveaway!





The Haunting of Thores-Cross


I could not look down at myself. I could not bear the sight of Mam’s clothes on me. Both skirt and shawl itched. I knew I would be aware of every thread of wool on my skin all day. More noise at the door, and I followed Mary downstairs. Digger and his son, Edward, had arrived with the cart to take Mam to the church. I let Mary Farmer organise them. It were Mary who urged their care. Mary who gave instructions to John over Pa. Mary who pushed me through the door and out into bright sunlight. It were Mam’s funeral, how could the sun shine? I looked back at the house and, for a moment, pity for Pa mixed with my despair. How long before Digger’s cart came for him?
‘Come on, lass, no dawdling!’

I turned back to the cart and started the long walk behind it down the hill, Mary Farmer at my side. After a few steps I stopped hearing her endless chatter. It became just another sound of the country, like the birdsong. Ever present but meaningless. We passed the smithy and William Smith joined us, then the Gate Inn and Robert and Martha Grange.

One by one, the village turned out, dressed in their best, and fell in behind us. Mary Farmer greeted them all. I hardly noticed. I felt as if my insides had frozen. My heart, my lungs, belly, everything. With each step, they splintered further. I wondered if I would make it as far as the church at the other side of Thores-Cross or whether I would be left on the side of the lane, a heap of cracked and broken ice.

‘Here.’ Mary Farmer nudged me and held out a handkerchief. ‘Thought this might come in useful. John won’t miss it. Not today.’

I took it. I had not realised I were crying, but when I wiped my face and eyed the scrap of cloth, it were sopping wet. My eyes and nose must have been streaming since we left the house.

I scratched my shoulder. Remembered I were wearing Mam’s clothes and lost myself in sobs. Mary Farmer tried to put an ample arm around me, but I shrugged her off. I wondered if I would ever stop crying. The cart reached the bridge and turned right. I followed, walking alongside the river, the same walk I used to make every other Sunday with Mam and Pa. We shared a curate with Fewston and would have to make that walk twice a month, unless Robert Grange were making the trip in his dray cart and we could ride the two miles over the moor. I realised with a start that I would not have to do that any more – not if I did not want to. Less than half the village made the trip to Fewston, claiming a variety of ills, and we only went because Mam insisted. I cried harder at the jolt of relief I felt.


‘Here we are, lass. Thee stick with me, I’ll get thee through this.’ Mary Farmer clung to my arm and I peered at the church. Digger and Edward lifted Mam down from the cart, ready for various men from the village to carry it inside. Robert Grange, William Smith, Thomas Fuller and George Weaver. Our closest neighbours. I took a deep breath and followed them into the plain single-storey stone building with the steps so worn they were more like a ramp. It were cold inside, despite the July sun. Or maybe that were me. Still ice, still cracking, but still in one piece.




2 comments

  1. Looks like a really good story!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Best of luck with the book and book tour! I included the tour in the Thursday, Feb. 07, 2019 edition of The BookTube Your Shelf Daily Reader: https://paper.li/Readeropolis/1517059010#/

    ReplyDelete