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Author Q&A @Hathor1112 | The Sydney St. John Mysteries Book Tour and $20 Amazon GC / eBook #Giveaway | #Mystery

The Sydney St. John Mysteries by Cary Osborne  are on virtual book tour. The mystery stops at Readeropolis with an author inte...




The Sydney St. John Mysteries by Cary Osborne are on virtual book tour.

The mystery stops at Readeropolis with an author interview.

Be sure to enter for a chance to win the giveaway for a $20 Amazon GC or ebook of Oklahoma Winds (1 winner each) and follow the Silver Dagger book tour (for other dates see the link at the bottom of the post).


How long have you been writing?
Over 40 years.  Although I didn’t get published right away, I wrote a lot before then.  It took seven years to get my first novel, Iroshi, published.  Before that, I’d had several short stories published.

Do the characters all come to you at the same time or do some of them come to you as you write?
Since I always begin a story with an idea, the characters come along as I write.  My main character is always a woman. Being a woman, I can understand them better than I do men, although I quite often have romantic entanglements and will write from a male character’s POV.

What book do you think everyone should read?
There are so many.  In horror, the one book I would recommend is Grendel by John Gardner.  It’s wonderfully scary.  Mainstream, To Kill a Mockingbird.  That novel blew me away.  In science fiction, a little known, short novel, The Soul Eater by Mike Resnick.  Also, Buddy Holly is Alive and Well on Ganymede by Bradley Denton.  It’s a really fun read.  In history, I love the Ohio Valley series by Alan Eckert.  They’re narrative history which makes them very readable. I just realized those are all older works, but they are still so very readable.

More modern works, especially mysteries, I love the Inspector Gamache series by Louise Penny.  The Comissario Brunetti mystery series by Donna Leon is lots of fun and the reader learns a lot about Venice.  In nonfiction, Hidden Figures, that was made into a movie, is an excellent read.

Do you prefer to write in silence or with noise? Why?
I’ve found that I can’t really write in silence.  Every morning, during the week, I have coffee and something to eat at a local coffee shop and work for 3-4 hours.  I feel very lucky that they don’t mind my taking up a table for that long, but no matter how busy they are, I always find room.

Do you write one book at a time or do you have several going at a time?
Several.  When I finish one book, I work on another, while I let the finished work cool.  At one time I had six different books going at the same time, but that wasn’t a good thing.  I’d sit with my fingers on the keyboard and wonder which novel I should be working on. Two or three at one time is manageable.  Writing in several genres helps a lot with that. I also work on short stories along with the novels. I don’t write as many short works as I used to, but I love that format and want to keep my hand in, not to mention a kind of instant gratification at finishing a piece; that takes longer with novel-length works.

What is your writing process? For instance do you do an outline first? Do you do the chapters first?
I’ve always been a pantser, someone who writes a novel straight through, no outline, no synopsis until it’s done.  Someone once said that she wrote to see how the story ends. That’s me.

Do you believe in writer’s block?
I believe there are times when a writer finds it difficult, or nearly impossible, to write.  Life interferes in so many ways. Some people are better at working through such things. Too many people believe that writing is not only a hobby for most people, but that anyone can do it.  It takes a lot of discipline to sit down at the computer every day, working alone, putting words down in the right sequence. Sometimes those words don’t come or each word is pulled out of the mind kicking and screaming.


Oklahoma Winds
The Sydney St. John Mysteries Book 1
by Cary Osborne
Genre: Mystery


In Oklahoma, spring brings storms raging across the American prairie, too often spawning tornadoes that lash the land. But this spring Sydney St. John finds herself fighting for her life against another danger, one from the past. When her intern's body is discovered in the archives processing room, everyone wants to believe the girl's death was an accident or a horrible mistake. But Sydney sets out to discover whether the cruel murder of today resulted from another crime committed nearly seventy years earlier, searching for clues as only an archivist can. Her search leads her to another danger, different, in the person of Ben Bartlett, grandson of the creator of the very collection at the center of the mystery. Is he to be her lover? Or her murderer?


OKLAHOMA WINDS is an engrossing thriller that reveals the inexorable links present-day events (and crimes) always have to the past. We are forever connected to the history that brought us to where we are now, and unraveling the tangled truths of that history can shed a brilliant light on who we have become. Yes, OKLAHOMA WINDS is a murder mystery, and a fascinating one. But it's also a testament to the power of the past over our lives. Having had some experience with research librarians and archivists, I've always known they were some of the most brilliant (yet unsung) detectives among us . . . and the protagonist of OKLAHOMA WINDS is long-overdue proof of that. Sydney St. John does for archivists what Indiana Jones did for archaeologists -- and I can't wait to see what mysteries she'll tackle next!
--Brad Denton, author of Blackburn and Sergeant Chip





Oklohoma Winter: Black Ice
The Sydney St. John Mysteries Book 2


Oklahoma, the state that ranks second as most dangerous in the U.S. when it comes to weather. Too often, the wind comes sweeping down the plain, with a vengeance. In winter, black ice glides onto the roads, barely seen, and when the wheels of a vehicle run onto it, a driver had best beware.


It’s winter in Oklahoma, and Sydney St. John finds murder among the papers of the Filmore County Historical Archives. The collection is that of Carl Blair, rancher, politician, father, and husband, who ruled his land and his family without the need for compassion, or love. Although gone these many years, his grandchildren and Lawrence, his only surviving son, still suffer from his cruelty and heavy hand. It's Sydney who must untangle the web that begins with racism and murder. Ben Bartlett her lover, still living in California, is helpless to save her from natural disasters and festering family hatred.





Saving Souls
The Sydney St. John Mysteries Book 3


Sydney St. John, still living and working in Gansel, Oklahoma, hopes to never be involved in a murder investigation again. She plans on being content with organizing the historical documents in the Filmore County Historical Archives. But when Patrick O’Kelley, preaching to no one on the corner opposite the archives in twenty-degree weather, is found murdered, her curiosity once again gets the better of her.


The facts she discovers lead her to hidden gold, oil rights, and Edward Capeheart O’Kelley, the man who shot Bob Ford, Jesse James’s killer. What does the murder in the late 1800s have to do with Patrick O’Kelley’s death in the 21st century?






Cary Osborne has been writing for more than two decades, delving into many genres including science fiction, fantasy, mystery, horror, and romance. Having once been told that there aren't enough generalists in the world, and having an interest in many worldly aspects, makes it difficult to settle into a single mold. Ancient history, being one of those interests, she uses her studies in the subjects and backgrounds for her stories, both long and short.





Follow the tour HERE for exclusive content and a giveaway!









5 comments

  1. I really like these covers and the Oklahoma Winds one in particular.

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  2. I think the Saving Souls cover is my favorite.

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  3. I don't have any particular questions, but I like all the covers. :)

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  4. The covers are simple, but interesting.

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  5. When I think about Oklahoma once of the first things that comes to my mind is tornadoes for sure.

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