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Tips for First Time Novelists by @dseaburn | Gavin Goode Book Tour and $25 Amazon GC #Giveaway | #LiteraryFiction

Gavin Goode  by David B. Seaburn  is on virtual book tour. The literary fiction stops at Readeropolis with an author gues...




Gavin Goode by David B. Seaburn is on virtual book tour.


The literary fiction stops at Readeropolis with an author guest post.

Be sure to enter for a chance to win the giveaway for a $25 Amazon GC and follow the Silver Dagger book tour (for other dates see the link at the bottom of the post).




Tips for First Time Novelists
David B. Seaburn
Sitting down for the first time to start writing a novel may feel like climbing Mt. Everest without a guide (or adequate oxygen). While there is no sure-fire formula for success, here are some things to keep in mind as you begin your climb.
  1. Write about something that interests you Don’t start by trying to figure out what readers like or want (many will disagree with this!). If you write well about what interests you, in all likelihood, it will be interesting to others.
  2. Consider first person Writing in first person can be much less complicated in that you only have to develop a single voice (hard enough). Third person requires developing multiple voices and a narrator’s voice to accommodate them. 
  3. When it comes to characters, less may be more Three or four characters generate countless interactions. Adding more may become cumbersome and overwhelming. The risk is that some of those characters may end up one dimensional or underdeveloped.
  4. Don’t worry if the path ahead is unclear Many novelists do not know what the end of the story will be when they sit down to write the first sentence. Knowing the ending is not necessary. You will discover it as you write.
  5. Have a problem or conflict in mind It helps to have a central dilemma driving your story from the beginning. A secret, a loss, conflicting desires, something that creates tension between characters. One is plenty. Others may arise as you progress through the narrative. 
  6. Find your writing groove Where you write, how much you write, when you write; there is no right way to write. It needs to fit your personality. 
  7. Saying ‘I can’t find time to write’ may not be true Of course, it may be difficult for many of us to find time; but often the time exists (even in small bits and pieces). But we are convinced we need lots of time, and when we can’t find it, we don’t write at all. 
  8. Don’t wait for inspiration If you do, you may never write at all! Sometimes we feel inspired, but mostly we don’t. It’s better to think of writing as ‘work,’ very important work, but work, nevertheless. It’s important to sit down and do it, even when we don’t feel we have anything to say. Writing is its own inspiration. 
  9. Read your work out loud This is a good way to see whether your writing has rhythm and flow. In particular, read dialogue out loud to see whether it sounds like anyone would actually say it.
  10. Use accessible language A reader shouldn’t need a dictionary while reading your work. By and large, a novel should read like spoken language.
  11. Consider short chapters One way to think about chapters is that they should complete a single ‘thought.’ Short chapters also help maintain rhythm and movement.
  12. Try to avoid ‘very’ and ‘!’ in narration They can be used in dialogue. The element of exclamation should be contained in how you articulate what you are discussing.
  13. Show, don’t tell Saying a character was feeling depressed is not as effective as describing how hard it is for that character to get out of bed in the morning. 


Gavin Goode
by David B. Seaburn
Genre: Literary Fiction 


I don’t know how, and I don’t know why, but I think I died today.”

So begins the complex and mysterious journey of Gavin Goode and his family. What happened to Gavin and why? What secrets will emerge along the way? Frankie, his wife and a dress store owner, feels guilty, but why? His son, Ryan, who owns an ice cream parlor, and daughter-in-law, Jenna, who is a bank manager, are expecting their first baby. How will this trauma affect them? And what of Rosemary, Frankie’s best friend? Or Ben Hillman and eleven year old, Christopher? How are they implicated in the events that unfold around Gavin’s misfortune?

This is a story of despair and hope, dreams and reality, uncertainty and faith,humor, secrecy, forgiveness and beginnings. As in his previous novels, David B. Seaburn demonstrates his in-depth understanding of the human experience and his storytelling mastery.





In 2010 I retired after having been the director of a public school based free family counseling center. 


Prior to that I was an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center for almost twenty years. During my tenure there I taught in a Family Medicine Residency Program, practiced Medical Family Therapy and was the Director of a Family Therapy Training Program.

In addition to this I am a retired Presbyterian minister, having graduated from seminary (Boston University) in 1975. I served a church full-time from 1975-1981 before entering the mental health field permanently. I am married; we have two adult daughters and two wonderful granddaughters.

My educational background includes two master's degrees and a PhD. Most of my career was as an assistant professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. There I wrote two professional books and over 65 papers and book chapters. 

In addition to long fiction, I write personal essays, many of which have been published in the Psychotherapy Networker magazine. 

I also write a blog, "Going Out Not Knowing," for Psychology Today magazine (http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/going-out-not-knowing).





Follow the tour HERE for exclusive excerpts, guest posts and a giveaway!





27 comments

  1. Replies
    1. That's great. I think you'd like what's inside, too.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  2. Best of luck with the book and book tour! I included the tour in the Sunday, Jun. 30, 2019 edition of The BookTube Your Shelf Daily Reader: https://paper.li/Readeropolis/1517059010#/

    ReplyDelete
  3. This story sounds interesting and unique. I'm looking forward to reading it. Your background is very interesting too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great. I hope you enjoy it.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  4. The book cover intrigues me!

    Julie DOT Matek 79 at Yahoo DOT com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What's inside will intrigue you even more.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  5. This sounds very different and I think it would be fun to read.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you have a chance to read it. I think you'd like it.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  6. Replies
    1. You're exactly right, Rebecca. I think you'd like it.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  7. Interesting cover, sounds like a good read.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you read it. You'll like it.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  8. Cool cover--reminded me of a 1960's movie poster

    ReplyDelete
  9. I like the cover, and look forward to the book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wonderful, Deborah! I hope you like i.
      Dave Seaburn

      Delete
  10. The cover is very unique
    Ashley c
    Addictedtorodeo at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  11. I like the Mid-Century Modern cover art.

    ReplyDelete
  12. The book cover is very graphic and interesting. I think the book sounds like something I would enjoy.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Congratulations on the book. You have a very impressive background.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Looks like an interesting book.
    Thanks for the contest. 

    ReplyDelete
  15. The book cover is very interesting and makes me wonder what the book is about.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I like the book cover. I hate overly pretentious book covers that really can't capture the story, so why do they try. I hope there is a detailed description on the back (or on the Amazon page) which is how I decide whether or not to buy a book.

    ReplyDelete

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