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Read an Excerpt of GOUSTER GIRL by David E. Gumpert Book Tour | Goddess Fish Promotions Presents Young Adult

Goddess Fish Promotions has organized a Virtual Excerpt Tour for GOUSTER GIRL by David E. Gumpert. The young adult is available now fro...


Goddess Fish Promotions has organized a Virtual Excerpt Tour for GOUSTER GIRL by David E. Gumpert. The young adult is available now from Lauson Publishing, Inc. 

David E. Gumpert will be awarding a $25 gift card to Garrett Popcorn, then a water bottle with Chicago flag for a second winner, and a Mug with Chicago flag for a third winner, all randomly drawn via rafflecopter during the tour.

Be sure to follow the tour and comment; the more you comment, the better your chances of winning. The tour dates can be found by clicking the banner below.





Gouster Girl
by David E. Gumpert 


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GENRE: YA, Young Adult 


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BLURB:

Gouster Girl is the coming of age, risky affair between Valerie Davis a cute black girl from the South Side of Chicago and nerdy white Jeffrey Stark. 

While the two are somewhat smitten they are late to realize that falling in love on Chicago’s South Side in 1963 is a highly risky business for an interracial couple.

Opportunities arise for both of them to help one another out of tough fixes—he saves her from attack at an all-white amusement park and she saves him from injury in a racial brawl at their high school. But as their romance becomes more serious, so do the racial dangers. White police target Valerie as a prostitute and black gang members see Jeffrey as trying to sexually exploit a black girl. Seemingly inevitably, the blossoming romance collides head on with the realities of Northern-style racism one hot summer afternoon at one of Chicago’s most beautiful Lake Michigan beaches, when a racial protest turns ugly, confronting the couple with terrible choices.

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EXCERPT:

Then Eddie Gulden showed up, and before we even picked teams, he was popping-off about “the darkies” he had heard were coming to Rainbow Beach that afternoon, and how they were “pushing their way into another place they’re not wanted.”

Eddie’s popping-off was an unpleasant reminder of the intensifying racial tensions popping up in more and more places around South Shore, including Rainbow Beach. The expansive beach sat on Lake Michigan about two miles south and east from our apartment, an easy bicycle ride for me through safe white neighborhoods.

While the name sounded idealistic, a plaque near the entrance explained that the beach got its name from a World War I Army division known for its bravery and fighting ability. The beach extended for about a half mile south from 75th Street, to its main entrance at 79th Street, a broad expanse of soft inviting beige sand.

There was always a special excitement about playing softball there, versus some of the schoolyards or parks nearer our apartment. The complex was mammoth and busy and well maintained. It had a big refreshment stand and even a building with showers at the main beach entrance where you could change your clothes.

On any sunny spring Saturday morning, it was a beehive of sporting activity, with its tennis courts, softball fields and wide-open grassy space to play Frisbee. Near the entrance, visitors often became entranced by intense games of handball between grunting and huffing men of all ages raging in half a dozen white-walled courts.

There was another beach further north, closer to our apartment, which might have been comparable to Rainbow Beach—the 63rd Street Beach. But I had no idea exactly how comparable, because I had never been there. It was the Negro beach—the beach I assumed Booker and Valerie and Tyrone hung out at on weekends.

I wouldn’t have minded looking for Valerie at the 63rd Street beach, but biking or walking there would have been seriously risky because I’d likely be one of the few, or maybe even the only white person there. I didn’t know for certain, but I imagined lots of gousters like Booker and his friends would be hanging out there, without even the minimal adult supervision we had at Hyde Park High.

I figured Negro kids had similar racial fears, viewing Rainbow Beach as the white beach. You didn’t see any Negroes at Rainbow Beach, probably for the same reasons you didn’t see whites at the 63rd Street Beach. No one wanted to risk being a racial target. 


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AUTHOR Bio and Links:

David E. Gumpert grew up on the South Side of Chicago, in South Shore and Hyde Park. In the years since graduating from the University of Chicago, he has attended Columbia Journalism School and worked as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal and an editor for the Harvard Business Review and Inc. magazine. He has also authored ten nonfiction books on a variety of subjects—from entrepreneurship and small business management to food politics. His most prominent titles include How to Really Create a Successful Business Plan (from Inc. Publishing); How to Really Start Your Own Business (Inc. Publishing); Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Food Rights (Chelsea Green Publishing), and The Raw Milk Answer Book (Lauson Publishing).

He spent ten years in the 1990s and early 2000s researching his family's history during the Holocaust. The result was a book co-authored with his deceased aunt Inge Belier: Inge: A Girl’s Journey Through Nazi Europe (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing).

He spent much of the last half-dozen years going back to his own roots in Chicago to research and write the historical novel, Gouster Girl. While some of it stems from his own experiences growing up in South Shore and Hyde Park, he also conducted significant additional research to complete the book in late 2019.

Author Website: http://www.goustergirl.com/


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GIVEAWAY:


David E. Gumpert will be awarding a $25 gift card to Garrett Popcorn, then a Water bottle with Chicago flag for a second winner, and a Mug with Chicago flag for a third winner, all randomly drawn via rafflecopter during the tour,

a Rafflecopter giveaway

4 comments

  1. Yes, thanks for hosting. The excerpt you feature from "Gouster Girl" conjures up all kinds of feelings for me, about the intensity of the racial tension on the South Side of Chicago in the early 1960s. Even though beaches were technically open to all races, in practice, the beaches remained highly segregated, like much of Chicago.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This book sounds amazing. Something my daughter and I would both enjoy reading.

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  3. Great cover & excerpt, thanks for sharing them :)

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