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Author Q&A ft @sanzaki_kojika | The Dragon Pillars Book Tour and $15 Amazon GC / eBooks #Giveaway | ##EpicFantasy

The Dragon Pillars Series by Sanzaki Kojika is on virtual book tour. The epic fantasy stops at Readeropolis with an author inter...


The Dragon Pillars Series by Sanzaki Kojika is on virtual book tour.

The epic fantasy stops at Readeropolis with an author interview.

Be sure to enter for a chance to win the giveaway for a $15 Amazon gift card or ebooks of both books (1 winner each) and follow the Silver Dagger book tour (for other dates see the link at the bottom of the post).



What inspired you to write this book? The basic premise of the Dragon Pillars books was just a dream. As all dreams go, there were some elements that were crisp with details, but much of it was so vague by the time I woke up. The concept of Pillars upholding the world was something I actually kicked around starting back in high school for a short story. It had no dragons, but it was a fantasy-story. It was completely different from what I ended up with here. I also knew I wanted to do a lot of things differently than how others had, or what was considered the norm. The rest fell in place when I started to outline it out. For instance, I knew that I didn’t want Water to be the healer type, I didn’t want Fire to be the fighter. I sort of mixed it around and figured out what I liked, plus as the Pillars themselves came to life, it made it much easier. I like the idea of balance of the elements, especially with things like Dark and Light. What can we expect from you in the future? The third book, Shadow and Light, of course, is one of my next big projects. I intend for it to be the last story in the world, though I have kicked around the idea of playing with some of the other Pillar sets, especially those that get briefly mentioned during the story. I have been looking forward most to Shadow and Light, so the first two books were me working up to that. The Shadow Pillar is my favorite character, and I can’t wait to work with his development. Once the third book releases, I may look into doing a second art challenge, but this time including the Shadow and Light Pillars, as I avoided adding them in to the original since they were too major spoiler. There are bits and pieces of them in there, and some people may have gotten a good sense of Shadow from the one image he shows up in, but I’d like to have them showing their faces, not just vague images. I’ve also had readers ask me about inserting some illustrations straight into the story, so the books may see another edition later on with that sort of feel. I would really like to do hardback versions if it comes to that. I also really want to get this series as audiobooks. That will probably be a big project after I finish writing the third book. Do you have any “side stories” about the characters? Not that I’ll ever probably write. I have ideas in my head of things that I ended up not incorporating into the books, but I’m not sure how they would really work out as written side stories. I’ve really kicked around the idea of maybe doing a write up of Garred’s first introduction to Vivdaugas and while he was in the Archivist course. I also want to work more with Senka’s backstory, though it may not need too much more added. At most, I might do an after story as a sort of epilogue thing, but it may end up just being the last chapter of book three. That mostly depends on how long the book ends up being. The only series of mine that I have some side stories written out and eventually will get an anthology book is the Archive of Sinners. The reason that one has one over the others though is because it’s written in first person, therefore you only get to understand Vere’s thoughts and not the rest of the cast. Dragon Pillars is written in third person omniscient, which is my usual style of writing. I’d like to think everyone gets good insight through that writing style, but I suppose if I had a lot of people ask about it, I might be inclined to dig deeper. Can you tell us a little bit about the characters in Dragon Pillars? The cast is quite varied, and I did so intentionally. Each of the characters come from very different places and have different habits and even ideals. Garred Conway sort of became the leader of the group, mostly because he was the first Pillar. He is gentle and good-natured, a total loyalist, and definitely dedicated to protecting the world. He sometimes teases those he’s super close to, but never in a way that causes offense. He’s outgoing and generally well-liked, which is why he picked the gloomy, anti-social Archivist as his best friend. Aysu, the Water Dragon, and his partner. She is protective and level-headed, but also gets in over her head a lot. She feels better when she has others to rely on, since she knows her own limits. They get along pretty well and are probably the best match out of the Dragons and their Pillars. Shula is the second Pillar, the healer turned Pillar of Fire. She has a fiery personality and is very stubborn. She has a bit of an inferiority complex, especially when it comes to her healing powers…or rather, lack thereof. She also can be quite snarky. I enjoyed writing her much more than I ever expected. Keahi, the Fire Dragon, shares in her personality for the most part, but he is much more playful. Together they want to heal the world with their flames. The Earth and Wind Pillars don’t appear until book two, so I won’t say too much about them. Simply, the Earth Dragon is a warrior while his Pillar is a pacifist; the Wind Dragon is the sweet motherly type while her Pillar is a crude brat. The other main characters are the two Defenders, Lady Vahan and Sir Graham, who travel with them. Lady Vahan is powerful and overbearing at times. She’s the type to raise the Pillars with tough love, rather than babying themselves. Sir Graham was once Garred’s teacher, so he has his own responsibilities to his students. He believes in their abilities and helps keep them in check. The Archivist Senka Elam rounds out the party. He likes to act grumpy and keep to himself, but Garred always pulls him out of his shell. His research has been very helpful in their quest, but he doubts himself and his abilities often as the only member in their party without the strength to fight. Where did you come up with the names in the story? I knew what meaning I wanted the names to have, and even the nationality for most of them, so I actually go to behindthename.com and use that to help narrow it down. For the ones that I can’t do that with, I also will research names and the language of the nationality the character represents in my mind and use that as a base. All of their names relate back to their role in the story, even if it’s not always super obvious. I wanted to keep as much of the cultures in tack that I was basing their homes off of, so I felt it was only appropriate to use actual names and words from those languages to represent that. It’s probably easiest to understand where the Earth and Wind Pillars come from based on both their names and cultures, but even Garred and Shula represent theirs to an extent. What did you enjoy most about writing this book? I’ve always enjoyed that when writing, no matter what you have planned, that sometimes, the characters seem to do whatever they want to, anyways. I was prepared to have difficulty writing some of the characters in their roles, especially Shula. She quickly became one of my favorites to write, just for how snarky she developed. I always intended her personality to be that type to a degree, but it definitely evolved in a much deeper manner than expected. And she’s not the only character that really took on their own life. Getting to write these characters and just sort of flow into what they would do and who they really are is always exciting. I think most writers can agree that stories just take over a life of their own after a while of working on them, and it’s always fun to go back and read through it and be like “wow, that really happened.” It doesn’t usually change the major developments for me, but it has changed character relationships or even the base dynamic of the cast or events. Who designed your book covers? So, on top of being a writer, I am also an illustrator and designer. I have a bachelor’s in design, so I try to use it as much as I can. I can’t always get exactly what I want, but I always get to something that I find presentable. In the case of Dragon Pillars, I wanted the focus to be the mural that is the starting scene of the book. The mural represents the legend and each of the Dragons, so it comes up often. And of course, it was specifically spaced out so it could be shifted around for each book- Water & Fire, Earth & Wind, Shadow & Light. I also liked the idea of the rest of the book looking more like a leather journal, since the journal Senka carries with him is what guides them during a big part of their quest. It was a simple design, but it accented what I wanted to without overdoing it. The dragon doodle I scribbled for use in the interior was a nice addition to pull it all together. If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book? There was actually one scene in Earth & Wind that I was really unsure about. Specifically, it’s the scene where the Earth Pillar makes his contract. Every other Pillar makes their contract in private, where no one else is really around to hear or see, even if other characters are in the scene. This one was purposely done around other characters, but I was never sure if that was the right choice. I went back and forth with wondering if the scene was important at all, or if it should have been done as more of a flashback-type deal. I decided to leave it as is, and so far the reviews are great, so I’m hoping that was the best idea.
If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead? I haven’t actually given a lot of thought to most of the characters. I have an idea of what they all look like, and have even drawn them out, but I didn’t use one particular source. I’m also not super up on celebrities, so I’m sure there are ones out there that would be amazing that I don’t even know. The only one I have thought about is Lady Vahan. She is a powerful woman who just exudes her aura. I think Danai Gurira would be perfect for the role. She is an amazing actress and I just love the strength she gives off. She’s not quite as muscular as I imagine Lady Vahan to be, but there’s so much about her that is perfect, she would be my number one choice. What is your favorite part of this book and why? My favorite part of the book series I know won’t be until three, but I do have a scene in book two that I absolutely loved. I’ll try to keep this spoiler light, since it’s closer to the end, but I really had so much fun with the Wind Pillar, especially right before she awoke. This character particularly I didn’t want to stand out too much until it was her time to shine. I thought a lot about what I would do in her situation and how someone in her position would handle it. I had an image burned into my mind as to what would happen, and I’m happy that I was able to get it worked out perfectly. I think if you read the book for yourself, you’ll understand the scene I’m talking about. If you could spend time with a character from your book whom would it be? And what would you do during that day? It would be either Senka or Lady Vahan. With Senka, I would love to pick all that knowledge out of his brain. I imagine he would get annoyed with me a lot but would also appreciate my earnest interest in learning all I could. He has softened over time during the books, so he would be easier to talk with in book two rather than the beginning of book one. For Lady Vahan, I’m not sure what I would do with her, but she just is such an amazing person in my eyes. Perhaps a lot of her is what I would like to be, but I feel I tend to fall short. I’m sure she’d have a lot to teach me, even if it’s not the quite the same as Senka’s lessons would be. He has book knowledge while she possesses a knowledge about the world that can only be gained from immense experience. Maybe I’d ask her for a training regime I could handle, but I know she wouldn’t go easy on me. Are your characters based off real people or did they all come entirely from your imagination? All my characters are just made up. There is no one in particular that I can equate to any of them. And I think that makes it just more amusing. I have characters from other books that do draw from people I know, but with Dragon Pillars, I had specific ideas to the type of characters I wanted and there really isn’t anyone I know that fits the bill for any of them. Rather, the characters were formed off of abstract ideas…like Garred I knew I wanted him to be fluid like water, powerful yet gentle, and the protective type. The rest filled in based on those ideals. In many cases, they had their names and their ideas before they were fleshed out. The names helped solidify the ideas. Do your characters seem to hijack the story or do you feel like you have the reigns of the story? My characters definitely always take over my stories. Dragon Pillars is no different. They still get from point a to point b, but sometimes the path they take isn’t exactly what I intended. I try to do a bit of outlining prior to writing, but I expect things to have to change as the story evolves, so I edit and adapt as I need to. As the characters come to life, they have things they want to do and really become their own person. It would be possible to work them into the loosely planned elements of the story, but I prefer just letting them have their run. It makes the characters seem more real, and like not so much that I’m just writing a story but rather narrating someone else’s life. It’s a tremendously fun ride since there are things I don’t even expect to happen that just do as I’m typing. Convince us why you feel your book is a must read. Dragon Pillars is treated as a trilogy, but it’s simply just one long story broken into three parts. The world is magical in its own way, a variety of completely different cultures and lifestyles all built up on one continent. Each character is unique and driven by their own ideals, not just the mission they are given. The reader gets to take part in this, watching them overcome trials and hardship to all reach the same goal. I’ve immensely enjoyed writing this series and creating this world, so I hope that feeling is passed on to the readers. Have you written any other books that are not published? Working on some that may be published in the future, but if I finish a work, I generally tend to want to publish it in some form. I have a couple short stories written for my Archive of Sinners series that will eventually be in an anthology as I get a few more additional ones written (I already know what I want them to be). I’m also working on the next Archive of Sinners book, Envy, as well as writing Hanif, a sequel to Altier that was never planned but begged for so much I finally got my butt in gear. And of course, I have the next Dragon Pillars: Shadow & Light, underway. I wrote some stories that I never finished and never intend to. I had some weird ideas for stories that seemed okay until I tried to flesh them out, so they never went far. One in particular was about dragonflies and based on a silly concept I came up with as a child. I used to believe that dragonflies guided dragons through out world, since dragons couldn’t fully exist in our dimensional plane (a concept that carried over into Dragon Pillars to some extent). The story itself was about a girl who was able to vaguely see these dragons. The concept wasn’t horrible, but I honestly had no idea where the story was going. I ended up stopping it only after a few chapters. Fun Facts/Behind the Scenes/Did You Know? I do a lot of my writing in my office at work. I work at a print shop for part of the week, and we have a lot of downtime between clients and jobs. So a lot of my original drafting comes from that downtime, which means I also tend to move slow until I start throwing home time into it. NaNoWriMo is the time I get the most writing done period. I always use it as an excuse to get more writing out. I also let my readers vote on which story I will be putting all that work into, so if you follow me on social media, you’ll get a chance to vote, too. Dragon Pillars, strangely, got started because of one of those polls. It was an idea I had always kicked around and wanted to work with, so I stuck it into my voting polls a few years back with the lamest description ever, and somehow, it won by a landslide! I was excited and glad I finally got to write it.

Water & Fire 
The Dragon Pillars Book 1 
by Sanzaki Kojika 
Genre: Epic Fantasy 


There is a legend that everyone knows- the legend of the Dragon Pillars. Every several hundred years, darkness befalls the land. The Dragons awaken and choose their Pillars, humans strong enough to withstand their powers, and together they drive back the darkness.

In the towering cathedral of Vivdaugas, students flock to study the archives built upon the legend and train to reach the glory of its heroes. Garred Conway is preparing for his test to become a true Defender when a storm threatens to destroy the citadel, and the land around it. Trapped in the catacombs, desperate to save those he cares for, he finds help from the most surprising place- the Water Dragon Aysu. Now, as Aysu's new pillar, he finds himself with more responsibility thrust on him than he could have ever imagined. 

**Only .99 cents April 7th-14th!!** 




Earth & Wind 
The Dragon Pillars Book 2 


The Pillar of Fire Shula is left reeling with loss and a new heavy burden of responsibility. The Water Pillar Garred leads a small party into the dangerous Whispering Forest to seek out weapons that were blessed by the Light Dragon. Disaster is narrowly avoided, but it brings a dark secret to light.Once reunited, Shula steels her resolve and the journey continues. With two Dragons awoken, their quest for the third leads them to the harsh terrain of the desert. The sand dregs up a certain Defender’s self-proclaimed pathetic past and the hard feelings associated with it. Can a Dragon really chose a Pillar from an isolated people dedicated to a life of pacifism? 

**Only .99 cents May 4th– 11th!!** 






Fawn Szymoniak, aka “Sanzaki Kojika” has been a resident of the fantasy world from a young age, growing up in a house full of books and mythology. Her mother introduced her to fantasy works by authors like Barbara Hambly and Terry Brooks. By the age of 8, she had already written her first novel (albeit crudely). Since then, she has taken to mostly writing fantasy, following characters through magical worlds full of wonder and danger. Her series “The Archive of Sinners” stands out as her only non-fantasy, being a paranormal mystery. 

On top of her writing, she is also a freelance graphic designer. Her love of art and writing, spurred her onto comics. She has several graphic novels self-published, including her webcomic “Zos Kias,” which is over 10 years old. 





Follow the tour HERE for special content and a giveaway!




What inspired you to write this book?

The basic premise of the Dragon Pillars books was just a dream. As all dreams go, there were some elements that were crisp with details, but much of it was so vague by the time I woke up. The concept of Pillars upholding the world was something I actually kicked around starting back in high school for a short story. It had no dragons, but it was a fantasy-story. It was completely different from what I ended up with here. I also knew I wanted to do a lot of things differently than how others had, or what was considered the norm. The rest fell in place when I started to outline it out. For instance, I knew that I didn’t want Water to be the healer type, I didn’t want Fire to be the fighter. I sort of mixed it around and figured out what I liked, plus as the Pillars themselves came to life, it made it much easier. I like the idea of balance of the elements, especially with things like Dark and Light.

What can we expect from you in the future?

The third book, Shadow and Light, of course, is one of my next big projects. I intend for it to be the last story in the world, though I have kicked around the idea of playing with some of the other Pillar sets, especially those that get briefly mentioned during the story. I have been looking forward most to Shadow and Light, so the first two books were me working up to that. The Shadow Pillar is my favorite character, and I can’t wait to work with his development.
Once the third book releases, I may look into doing a second art challenge, but this time including the Shadow and Light Pillars, as I avoided adding them in to the original since they were too major spoiler. There are bits and pieces of them in there, and some people may have gotten a good sense of Shadow from the one image he shows up in, but I’d like to have them showing their faces, not just vague images.
I’ve also had readers ask me about inserting some illustrations straight into the story, so the books may see another edition later on with that sort of feel. I would really like to do hardback versions if it comes to that. I also really want to get this series as audiobooks. That will probably be a big project after I finish writing the third book.

Do you have any “side stories” about the characters?

Not that I’ll ever probably write. I have ideas in my head of things that I ended up not incorporating into the books, but I’m not sure how they would really work out as written side stories. I’ve really kicked around the idea of maybe doing a write up of Garred’s first introduction to Vivdaugas and while he was in the Archivist course. I also want to work more with Senka’s backstory, though it may not need too much more added. At most, I might do an after story as a sort of epilogue thing, but it may end up just being the last chapter of book three. That mostly depends on how long the book ends up being.
The only series of mine that I have some side stories written out and eventually will get an anthology book is the Archive of Sinners. The reason that one has one over the others though is because it’s written in first person, therefore you only get to understand Vere’s thoughts and not the rest of the cast. Dragon Pillars is written in third person omniscient, which is my usual style of writing. I’d like to think everyone gets good insight through that writing style, but I suppose if I had a lot of people ask about it, I might be inclined to dig deeper.

Can you tell us a little bit about the characters in Dragon Pillars?

The cast is quite varied, and I did so intentionally. Each of the characters come from very different places and have different habits and even ideals. Garred Conway sort of became the leader of the group, mostly because he was the first Pillar. He is gentle and good-natured, a total loyalist, and definitely dedicated to protecting the world. He sometimes teases those he’s super close to, but never in a way that causes offense. He’s outgoing and generally well-liked, which is why he picked the gloomy, anti-social Archivist as his best friend. Aysu, the Water Dragon, and his partner. She is protective and level-headed, but also gets in over her head a lot. She feels better when she has others to rely on, since she knows her own limits. They get along pretty well and are probably the best match out of the Dragons and their Pillars.
Shula is the second Pillar, the healer turned Pillar of Fire. She has a fiery personality and is very stubborn. She has a bit of an inferiority complex, especially when it comes to her healing powers…or rather, lack thereof. She also can be quite snarky. I enjoyed writing her much more than I ever expected. Keahi, the Fire Dragon, shares in her personality for the most part, but he is much more playful. Together they want to heal the world with their flames.
The Earth and Wind Pillars don’t appear until book two, so I won’t say too much about them. Simply, the Earth Dragon is a warrior while his Pillar is a pacifist; the Wind Dragon is the sweet motherly type while her Pillar is a crude brat.
The other main characters are the two Defenders, Lady Vahan and Sir Graham, who travel with them. Lady Vahan is powerful and overbearing at times. She’s the type to raise the Pillars with tough love, rather than babying themselves. Sir Graham was once Garred’s teacher, so he has his own responsibilities to his students. He believes in their abilities and helps keep them in check. The Archivist Senka Elam rounds out the party. He likes to act grumpy and keep to himself, but Garred always pulls him out of his shell. His research has been very helpful in their quest, but he doubts himself and his abilities often as the only member in their party without the strength to fight.

Where did you come up with the names in the story?

I knew what meaning I wanted the names to have, and even the nationality for most of them, so I actually go to behindthename.com and use that to help narrow it down. For the ones that I can’t do that with, I also will research names and the language of the nationality the character represents in my mind and use that as a base. All of their names relate back to their role in the story, even if it’s not always super obvious. I wanted to keep as much of the cultures in tack that I was basing their homes off of, so I felt it was only appropriate to use actual names and words from those languages to represent that. It’s probably easiest to understand where the Earth and Wind Pillars come from based on both their names and cultures, but even Garred and Shula represent theirs to an extent.

What did you enjoy most about writing this book?

I’ve always enjoyed that when writing, no matter what you have planned, that sometimes, the characters seem to do whatever they want to, anyways. I was prepared to have difficulty writing some of the characters in their roles, especially Shula. She quickly became one of my favorites to write, just for how snarky she developed. I always intended her personality to be that type to a degree, but it definitely evolved in a much deeper manner than expected. And she’s not the only character that really took on their own life. Getting to write these characters and just sort of flow into what they would do and who they really are is always exciting. I think most writers can agree that stories just take over a life of their own after a while of working on them, and it’s always fun to go back and read through it and be like “wow, that really happened.” It doesn’t usually change the major developments for me, but it has changed character relationships or even the base dynamic of the cast or events.

Who designed your book covers?

So, on top of being a writer, I am also an illustrator and designer. I have a bachelor’s in design, so I try to use it as much as I can. I can’t always get exactly what I want, but I always get to something that I find presentable. In the case of Dragon Pillars, I wanted the focus to be the mural that is the starting scene of the book. The mural represents the legend and each of the Dragons, so it comes up often. And of course, it was specifically spaced out so it could be shifted around for each book- Water & Fire, Earth & Wind, Shadow & Light. I also liked the idea of the rest of the book looking more like a leather journal, since the journal Senka carries with him is what guides them during a big part of their quest. It was a simple design, but it accented what I wanted to without overdoing it. The dragon doodle I scribbled for use in the interior was a nice addition to pull it all together.

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

There was actually one scene in Earth & Wind that I was really unsure about. Specifically, it’s the scene where the Earth Pillar makes his contract. Every other Pillar makes their contract in private, where no one else is really around to hear or see, even if other characters are in the scene. This one was purposely done around other characters, but I was never sure if that was the right choice. I went back and forth with wondering if the scene was important at all, or if it should have been done as more of a flashback-type deal. I decided to leave it as is, and so far the reviews are great, so I’m hoping that was the best idea.
If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I haven’t actually given a lot of thought to most of the characters. I have an idea of what they all look like, and have even drawn them out, but I didn’t use one particular source. I’m also not super up on celebrities, so I’m sure there are ones out there that would be amazing that I don’t even know. The only one I have thought about is Lady Vahan. She is a powerful woman who just exudes her aura. I think Danai Gurira would be perfect for the role. She is an amazing actress and I just love the strength she gives off. She’s not quite as muscular as I imagine Lady Vahan to be, but there’s so much about her that is perfect, she would be my number one choice.

What is your favorite part of this book and why?

My favorite part of the book series I know won’t be until three, but I do have a scene in book two that I absolutely loved. I’ll try to keep this spoiler light, since it’s closer to the end, but I really had so much fun with the Wind Pillar, especially right before she awoke. This character particularly I didn’t want to stand out too much until it was her time to shine. I thought a lot about what I would do in her situation and how someone in her position would handle it. I had an image burned into my mind as to what would happen, and I’m happy that I was able to get it worked out perfectly. I think if you read the book for yourself, you’ll understand the scene I’m talking about.

If you could spend time with a character from your book whom would it be? And what would you do during that day?

It would be either Senka or Lady Vahan. With Senka, I would love to pick all that knowledge out of his brain. I imagine he would get annoyed with me a lot but would also appreciate my earnest interest in learning all I could. He has softened over time during the books, so he would be easier to talk with in book two rather than the beginning of book one. For Lady Vahan, I’m not sure what I would do with her, but she just is such an amazing person in my eyes. Perhaps a lot of her is what I would like to be, but I feel I tend to fall short. I’m sure she’d have a lot to teach me, even if it’s not the quite the same as Senka’s lessons would be. He has book knowledge while she possesses a knowledge about the world that can only be gained from immense experience. Maybe I’d ask her for a training regime I could handle, but I know she wouldn’t go easy on me.

Are your characters based off real people or did they all come entirely from your imagination?

All my characters are just made up. There is no one in particular that I can equate to any of them. And I think that makes it just more amusing. I have characters from other books that do draw from people I know, but with Dragon Pillars, I had specific ideas to the type of characters I wanted and there really isn’t anyone I know that fits the bill for any of them. Rather, the characters were formed off of abstract ideas…like Garred I knew I wanted him to be fluid like water, powerful yet gentle, and the protective type. The rest filled in based on those ideals. In many cases, they had their names and their ideas before they were fleshed out. The names helped solidify the ideas.

Do your characters seem to hijack the story or do you feel like you have the reigns of the story? 

My characters definitely always take over my stories. Dragon Pillars is no different. They still get from point a to point b, but sometimes the path they take isn’t exactly what I intended. I try to do a bit of outlining prior to writing, but I expect things to have to change as the story evolves, so I edit and adapt as I need to. As the characters come to life, they have things they want to do and really become their own person. It would be possible to work them into the loosely planned elements of the story, but I prefer just letting them have their run. It makes the characters seem more real, and like not so much that I’m just writing a story but rather narrating someone else’s life. It’s a tremendously fun ride since there are things I don’t even expect to happen that just do as I’m typing.

Convince us why you feel your book is a must read.

Dragon Pillars is treated as a trilogy, but it’s simply just one long story broken into three parts. The world is magical in its own way, a variety of completely different cultures and lifestyles all built up on one continent. Each character is unique and driven by their own ideals, not just the mission they are given. The reader gets to take part in this, watching them overcome trials and hardship to all reach the same goal. I’ve immensely enjoyed writing this series and creating this world, so I hope that feeling is passed on to the readers.

Have you written any other books that are not published?

Working on some that may be published in the future, but if I finish a work, I generally tend to want to publish it in some form. I have a couple short stories written for my Archive of Sinners series that will eventually be in an anthology as I get a few more additional ones written (I already know what I want them to be). I’m also working on the next Archive of Sinners book, Envy, as well as writing Hanif, a sequel to Altier that was never planned but begged for so much I finally got my butt in gear. And of course, I have the next Dragon Pillars: Shadow & Light, underway.
I wrote some stories that I never finished and never intend to. I had some weird ideas for stories that seemed okay until I tried to flesh them out, so they never went far. One in particular was about dragonflies and based on a silly concept I came up with as a child. I used to believe that dragonflies guided dragons through out world, since dragons couldn’t fully exist in our dimensional plane (a concept that carried over into Dragon Pillars to some extent). The story itself was about a girl who was able to vaguely see these dragons. The concept wasn’t horrible, but I honestly had no idea where the story was going. I ended up stopping it only after a few chapters.

Fun Facts/Behind the Scenes/Did You Know?'-type tidbits about the author, the book or the writing process of the book.

I do a lot of my writing in my office at work. I work at a print shop for part of the week, and we have a lot of downtime between clients and jobs. So a lot of my original drafting comes from that downtime, which means I also tend to move slow until I start throwing home time into it. NaNoWriMo is the time I get the most writing done period. I always use it as an excuse to get more writing out. I also let my readers vote on which story I will be putting all that work into, so if you follow me on social media, you’ll get a chance to vote, too. Dragon Pillars, strangely, got started because of one of those polls. It was an idea I had always kicked around and wanted to work with, so I stuck it into my voting polls a few years back with the lamest description ever, and somehow, it won by a landslide! I was excited and glad I finally got to write it.





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